Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow.

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How to be Green for St Patrick’s Day & Easter

How to be Green for St Patrick’s Day & Easter

Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow.

How to be Green for St Patrick’s Day & Easter

by Nancy Marshall & #TeamClimeCo | March 12, 2020

The next two holidays on our calendar are full of green – green clothes, beers, eggs and grass.  As we prepare for these two upcoming holidays, let’s take a minute to think about how we could celebrate them in a greener way.  How can we make St Patrick’s Day and Easter sustainable?

We asked our ClimeCo team to share some of their top tips on how they practice being green during these two holidays.

St Patrick’s Day

  1. Reuse vs buying new. We used to live in Savannah, GA, where they hold the biggest St Patrick’s Day celebration in the entire U.S.  I save all our green clothing, beads, headbands, etc. and use it year after year.  With kids who outgrow clothing, we have often bought their shirts at consignment shops.  Choosing a simple green shirt allows you to wear them throughout the entire year.  –Nancy Marshall, Corporate Marketing Director.

  2. Dust off your bikes and ride to the St Patrick’s Day activities! As an avid bike rider, I save tons on gas riding my bike, which in turns reduces auto emissions entering the atmosphere.  Don’t have a bike, get one! Riding your bike (to school, work, the store, etc.) will make you healthier and in 3-6 months. The money you saved on gas and parking has officially paid for your new bike.  –Erik Cramer, Business Development Manager (Erik rides 5 miles round-trip a day)

  3. Paddy’s Day is one of my favorite holidays to celebrate. I reuse my beads, shamrock headband, earrings, and shirts annually. –Dani Pingitore, Marketing Coordinator

  4. Drink draft beer over bottle or can beer. Draft beer keg is the most environmentally responsible beverage package in the brewing industry today – it is returnable, refillable, and recyclable. – Justin Freeark, Project Manager, Design/Build Programs

  5. If you plan to go out for St. Patrick’s Day – avoid the crowds and go local! The less you (and the products you consume) travel, the less impact you have on the environment. –Lauren Mechak, Program Manager

Easter

  1. We used to host an Easter potluck at our house for about 3-4 families. Everyone would bring drinks with them for their family and we would have coolers full of cans and bottles.  I made sure we had out recycling bins so all the bottle and cans were collected after use and we could get them to our local recycling center.  –David Priddy, VP of Business Development

  2. If you need to buy Easter eggs, try to find eco eggs. I have seen a handful of stores carrying plant-based Easter eggs made from 100% renewable content. –Dani Pingitore, Marketing Coordinator

  3. Reuse vs buying new. With two young kids, I have bought nicely made Easter baskets and use them every year.  I also reuse our plastic eggs and Easter grass.  Instead of buying a bunch of cheap plastic bunny toys, our Easter Bunny gets my kids things they need for the summer like swimsuits, goggles, beach towels, and of course, candy.  –Nancy Marshall, Corporate Marketing Director

  4. Want to dye Easter eggs? Try using natural dye from fruits, vegetables, and spices you find in your home. Natural dye is safer for the environment, your body, and the compost pile. –Zach Palm, Senior Associate, Policy & Advisory

  5. Shop locally to prepare for your Easter dinner. Purchase local fruits and veggies, homemade pies, honey, and local meat. Your food will have less packaging, fresh, and supports your community. –Maria Finneran, Office Administrator

Whether you’re planning to go out for St Patrick’s Day party with friends or hosting a family dinner for Easter Sunday, try incorporating some of our fun tips and tricks and celebrate sustainably! 

 

About the Author

Nancy Marshall is a Corporate Marketing Director at ClimeCo. She is originally from Maryland and currently lives in Houston, Texas. She enjoys boating and fishing on Lake Livingston, cooking, baking (especially at Christmas), and crafting with vinyl.

Moving Forward with Net-Zero

Moving Forward with Net-Zero

Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow.

Moving Forward with Net-Zero

by Zach Harmer & Nancy Marshall | February 29, 2020

In late January 2020, the United States House Energy and Commerce Committee released a discussion document on the Climate Leadership and Environmental Action for our Nation’s (“CLEAN”) Future Act, which has the broad sweeping goal of reaching a “100% clean economy by 2050”.  It is one of many attempts from the federal government to align goals for creating an economy that achieves carbon neutrality.  In contrast to the political inertia we have seen in advancing meaningful climate action in some governments, we have witnessed a number of municipal, sub-national and international governments along with many multinational and local companies increase their commitments towards carbon neutrality.  So if we are seeing social, corporate and political trends towards a 100% clean economy, what is the role of legislation if action is already happening?  Why are announcements like the CLEAN Future Act still meaningful and needed?

First, let’s start with the question “What does a ‘100% Clean Economy’ really mean?” Everything has a carbon footprint – you have a personal one, your business has one, so does your favorite sports team and coffee shop. If you can find a way to reduce your personal carbon footprint, offset your remaining carbon impact, and/or support external efforts that make that footprint carbon neutral, you can achieve 100% net carbon neutrality.

Beyond these personal actions, we are seeing increasingly more corporate commitment to achieving net-zero emissions – from Microsoft’s decision to become carbon negative by 2030 to Cenovus Energy’s pledge to carbon neutrality by 2050. This growing number of commitments represents a significant shift towards a more carbon-conscious business world.  Parallel to these milestone announcements, we have begun to see some governments design the enabling and backstop legislation that sets clear and measurable emission reduction targets and provides a broad range of incentives to encourage citizens and businesses to reach a common goal.

At the individual level, reducing your carbon footprint, such as paying extra for green electricity, can be expensive and may not be an option for everyone. Similarly, reducing emissions at the corporate level reducing emissions may not be as economically and/or technologically feasible from sector to sector or from facility to facility. Therefore, one of the most important considerations for any net-zero legislation is to ensure that there are programs in place to support those areas of the economy most affected by the legislation; this can be achieved by providing extra support in the form of funding for the development and trial of new technologies, or for less stringent emission reduction targets.

The CLEAN Future Act provides just one example of how governments can define, target, and delegate the path to net-zero emissions by 2050. Canada, for example, has recently committed to net-zero emissions by 2050 and is developing an action plan. In addition to Canada, there are more than 70 other countries that have committed to being net-zero by 2050. Though the commitment remains the same, each country will have to develop their own unique strategy to achieve carbon neutrality. More interesting, perhaps, is how these countries may look to harmonize and coordinate their climate ambition to scale meaningful change and progress.

Currently, there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution to achieving net-zero emissions.  As we advance into the 2020s, we are likely to see more commitments to net-zero and new innovative approaches to reducing emissions. So, what can you do?

  1. Stay informed – with the actions being taken locally, at the community, state, and federal levels; and
  2. Make your voice heard – during government consultations or through your local representatives.

About the Authors

Zach Harmer is a Policy Analyst at ClimeCo. He lives in Calgary, Alberta, and is an avid outdoor enthusiast. In his spare time, Zach enjoys exploring the Rocky Mountains and cooking for family and friends.

Nancy Marshall is a Corporate Marketing Director at ClimeCo. She is originally from Maryland and currently lives in Houston, Texas. She enjoys boating and fishing on Lake Livingston, cooking, baking (especially at Christmas), and crafting with vinyl.

Catching The Wave

Catching The Wave

Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow.

Catching The Wave

by Nancy Marshall | January 31, 2020

 


On Wednesday, January 15th, some of the biggest brands in the Northwest launched “The Wave.” This is a new coalition made up of a diverse set of partners who pledge to work together to tackle some of the biggest sustainability challenges in the Northwest region of the U.S.  Their goal is to accelerate environmental programs for clean energy and transportation, zero waste, sustainable food, and clean air and water.

ClimeCo is happy to be a stakeholder in this coalition and will serve as carbon offset provider & expert. “This is definitely something we wanted to be a part of,” says Dan Linsky, VP of Voluntary Markets at ClimeCo, “big companies are already doing a lot, but a mass movement like this gives people the how, what, and where when it comes to doing more.”  ClimeCo’s role is to help The Wave with their goals for cleaner air and water by identifying and developing projects in the Northwest region to support the coalition with both carbon offsets and renewable energy credits.  “The environmental activity in the Northwest is very progressive,” says Linsky, “and we are ready to play a big role in these activities to help this grassroots coalition be successful.”

So how did this all get started and why?  We talked to Justin Zeulner, President & CEO of Pioneers of Sustainability, and one of the founders of The Wave.  “We must take action that will mitigate our environmental impacts,” says Zeulner, “creating alignment, sharing values and goals so that we can all work together in unison is key to help us all do more than what we are currently doing.”  For Zeulner, part of The Wave’s role is to help their partners understand how their business impacts the environment, help them to identify what goals they should strive to reach and how they can actually reach them. 

The Wave coalition believes that two things need to happen to really make a change.  First, we all need to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and second, we need to draw down legacy carbon out of the atmosphere.  Keeping it simple and focused with just these two steps and focusing on 5 areas (clean energy, clean and equitable transportation, healthy and sustainable food, zero waste, and clean air and water), The Wave believes change can happen.  “If we can get folks together, support them, help make change happen at a high level,” says Zeulner, “we will reach our vision of a cleaner world.  With real projects and real results, we will be a beacon for other regions to follow.” 

Click on The Wave to learn more and if you are located in the Northwest and are interested in taking the pledge, please click here.   

About the Author

Nancy Marshall is the Corporate Marketing Director at ClimeCo, Edenfort, and soon ClimeCoGreen. She is happily married to her husband for 18 years; they have two daughters and two fur babies. She is from Maryland but is currently living in Houston, TX. She loves to go boating and fishing on Lake Livingston, cook and bake (especially at Christmas), and enjoys crafting.

Making a Difference Today for a Better World Tomorrow

Making a Difference Today for a Better World Tomorrow

Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow.

Making a Difference Today for a Better World Tomorrow

by Nancy Marshall | December 3, 2019

“Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow” is our company tagline.  It was developed by our President, Bill Flederbach, and me as we were creating our new website in 2018.  Bill’s mentor had this motto, “Do the next right thing,” which Bill used as a foundation when he started ClimeCo 10 years ago.  As our company has grown and changed, the motto still serves as our foundation but, going forward, we felt that we needed to refresh it to carry us into the future.

For us as employees, our motto resonates so strongly, we want to make a positive difference today so that when the sun rises tomorrow, the world is a better place.  We do this with our project work – capturing greenhouse gas emissions and destroying them so that they don’t enter the atmosphere, or by converting waste methane into Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) and energy.  We do this in our environmental commodity transactions – we help companies who want to be greener, who wish to support projects that are making the world better by preserving an ecosystem while sequestering and or destroying carbon.  We do this in our policy and advisory work – keeping clients updated on the latest policy changes and advise them on how best to proceed in this everchanging world.  As we support this tagline in our everyday work, do we as a company do this in every aspect of our business? Does this carry down through to our employees’ personal lives?  Do we walk the walk 24/7?

As I reflect on our company retreat that was held the week before Thanksgiving (U.S.), we celebrated a successful year and were ecstatic to plan and strategize for 2020.  Our leaders talked about being real, honest and truthful, which has been a constant in everything we do as a company.  It started with Bill and continues with each one of us who works for ClimeCo.  What you see while visiting our offices, hear while talking to us on the phone, or see when you run into us with our families – we are always the same.  You do not see one side while at work and a different side while at home in our personal space. We live and breathe what we do – making the world better. 

There are two things we do at ClimeCo that we probably don’t talk about enough, but I would like to share with you today: 

1. We Don’t Emit Gas
2. We Volunteer

Pass The Gas

Everything has a carbon footprint!  Your business, your family (yes, even the dog), your favorite airline, your hotel chain of choice, the city you feel happiest in, your local sports teams, your favorite band and even that shoe brand you’re constantly getting ads for on Instagram. You name it, it probably has a carbon footprint.  Many of our clients work hard to lower their carbon footprint so that they, too, can make the world a better place.  At ClimeCo, we not only offset our company’s carbon footprint, we also offset each of our employee’s footprints as well.  This is a wonderful gesture ClimeCo generously makes for its employees.  It not only allows us to walk the walk, but it makes us proud to say we can talk the talk. In 2020, ClimeCo is going to be expanding our services by developing a website that allows everyone, from a small business, to an individual or family, or even an event to easily calculate their carbon footprint, receive tips on how to be greener, and purchase offsets.  What a great way to further influence others to make a difference today for a better world tomorrow.  I am very excited about this new venture and can’t wait to share it to help make an even bigger difference in 2020.

Volunteer Day

The second thing we do that doesn’t get enough exposure is our Volunteer program at ClimeCo.  At ClimeCo every year, each employee gets a paid day off to volunteer.  This day allows us to volunteer our time and truly support something we personally believe in and can make a difference in people’s lives.  Here are a few examples of what our team have volunteered for:

  • VP, Voluntary Markets, Dan Linsky, helped neighbors board up for Hurricane Dorian;
  • VP, Business Development, Dave Priddy served at a free dental clinic for underprivileged members of his community.
  • Marketing Coordinator, Dani Pingitore, cooked Thanksgiving turkeys and 100’s of cookies to provide for individuals and families who were experiencing food insecurity over the holidays, in the City of Reading.
  • VP of Policy & Advisory, Chelsea Bryant, Director of Policy & Advisory, Bennett Chin, Business Development Manager, Erik Cramer, and Policy Analyst, Zach Harmer volunteered their time and money by donating to Calgary Food Bank. 


This year, I decided to volunteer at my local elementary school’s Literacy Library.  This library is different than libraries we are used to seeing in schools.  The Literacy Library is a resource for teachers to have access to books for students that are at different reading levels than their peers. I was personally introduced to this unique library when my then 3rd grade daughter (now a 6th grader) was diagnosed with dyslexia.  This library is a valued resource for the kids, and I personally wanted to pay it forward so that future kids could access the same books my daughter did.  It felt great to do something for this library that would make it better for those who need it.

So, as we close out another year, I like to say I am thankful for what we do.  I am thankful for our company and its leaders. I am thankful that we not only make a difference today, but every day in everything we do as a company and as individuals.  As you reflect on your year and future goals, are you doing what you can to make the world better?  I encourage you to speak to your company’s leaders, your family, and your friends and say, let’s be green together, let’s volunteer together, let’s make this world better together!

About the Author

Nancy Marshall is the Corporate Marketing Director at ClimeCo, Edenfort and soon ClimeCoGreen.  She is happily married to her husband for 18 years; they have two daughters and one fur baby.  She is from Maryland but is currently living in Houston, TX.  She loves to go boating and fishing on Lake Livingston, cook and bake (especially at Christmas), and enjoys crafting. 

Challenge Accepted!!

Challenge Accepted!!

Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow.

Challenge Accepted!!

by Quin Pompi | November 5, 2019


When I posed a seemingly harmless question to a friend the other week, “Do you want to have kids?” their pessimistic response surprised me. They said they didn’t want to bring a life into a world that is destined for destruction (referencing the fires plaguing the West Coast and the superstorms that struck the East Coast earlier in 2019). Sensationalistic weather patterns aside, it’s a somewhat pragmatic outlook given the forecasted trajectory of Earth’s climate.[1] While I don’t disagree that the forecast looks rather grim, I do disagree with my friend’s assessment that a decline into a climactic apocalypse is inevitable. Call me an optimistic millennial, but instead of seeing climate change as an insurmountable eventuality that has been placed on my generation, I see it as a challenge.

A large part of solving this challenge will be the task of decarbonizing our energy systems. This change is already underway, and it’s accelerating. You may have seen recent headlines of large utilities offering their clients energy derived from 100% renewable sources,[2] or making commitments to decarbonize their energy mix by a target date.[3] Many see wind and solar as the most obvious solutions to accomplish this goal, mostly due to their scalability, but while they may be the most obvious solutions, those alone won’t be enough. We need to take a long look at all possible energy sources. Finding a solution will require strategies that involve deep levels of innovation and ingenuity.

 

One such strategy is to employ solutions derived from the natural world, otherwise known as nature-based solutions (NbS). NbS refers to the sustainable management and use of nature for tackling socio-environmental challenges. While wind and solar use renewable resources, there is a whole other set of renewable energy development methods that use biological systems to create energy. For example, anaerobic digestion (AD) harnesses the activities of small, naturally occurring microbes, which break down organic waste (e.g. food scraps, manure, wastewater) to produce biogas. The gas can combust to generate electricity and heat, or it can process into renewable natural gas (RNG) or transportation fuels.[4]

Obviously, RNG alone won’t solve the decarbonization crisis, but it serves as an example of an innovative technology that we’ve created using a non-conventional approach, and it can serve as a template for developing alternative renewable energy sources and innovations.

I’m not trying to offer a definitive solution for our path to decarbonization. Instead, I want to instill in you a lasting sentiment of hope. Climate change does not have to be an eventuality ending in climactic apocalypse, like my friend says it will. I am confident that we will find a solution, and quite frankly, I am excited; excited to see how we will arrive at that solution; excited for the innovations and technologies that will be developed; and finally, I am excited that if my friend chooses to do so, they can bring a child into this world with a guilt-free conscience.

About the Author

Quin Pompi, a Project Manager at ClimeCo, joined the company shortly after earning his Bachelor of Arts in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University.  As a Certified Financial Modeling and Valuation Analyst (FMVA) coupled with a biology background, Quin specializes in leading and supporting all facets of business development efforts relating to ClimeCo’s expanding biogas project portfolio.  In his free time, Quin enjoys hobbies such as skiing, fly-fishing, and cooking. Recently, he has partnered with a local chef to build a successful start-up business that provides mobile wood-fired pizza catering to public and private events by using fresh, local-sourced ingredients.

Carbon Consciousness & The Live Music Experience

Carbon Consciousness & The Live Music Experience

Making a difference today for a better world tomorrow.

Carbon Consciousness & The Live Music Experience

by Danielle A. Pingitore | September 26, 2019


The beautiful force and power of vocals. The inspiration in the effortless contrivance of instruments. The warmth of harmony and expression. The transcendent, uplifting magic of performance, which embodies it all. Music, a layered masterpiece, a universal language that speaks, heals, dreams, and resonates in one way or the other.

Music has always played an indispensable role in my life. During every weekend road trip of my childhood, the concert in the car to the destination was half the fun. From Janis Joplin, Grateful Dead, and The Temptations to Neil Young, Eric Clapton, and Alanis Morrisette, each song or artist ties into the memories of my youth, evoking a distinct feeling of nostalgia.

As I grew into my early 20s, live music became a favorite hobby of mine. I traveled near and far for music even though it was at the ease of my fingertips. For me, music was and will always be so much more than pressing play. The all-encompassing brilliance of music is what makes it special – seeing, hearing, feeling. It’s surrounding yourself with people who are all there for the same reason you are – to celebrate the live music experience.

It wasn’t until my late 20s that I began picking up on what goes into creating these live music events for artists and fans of music around the world. At this point, I was attending 15-25 concerts a year. I started thinking about the amount of fuel burning into the atmosphere while approaching traffic to the venue, the number of tickets printed, scanned and thrown away, the energy and power needed to produce flawless sound and lighting for 10,000+ people to enjoy. I began to see excess and waste where I once saw only joy and camaraderie.

After joining ClimeCo in mid-2018, I became more conscious of the environment and how impactful carbon is. I felt like the universe was working in my favor because months later we were in contact with one of my all-time favorite bands, Pearl Jam, whom I had gone to see in Philadelphia two years prior on their 25th Anniversary of Ten Tour. Pearl Jam ended up working with us to mitigate the carbon footprint of their 2018 European and US Tour through an Alaska-based forest preservation project, Afognak Island. They care about preserving and protecting wildlife, forests, oceans, and our planet. They didn’t have to go the extra mile to do this, but they did. Isn’t that incredible? 

A few months later, a fan tweeted Stephan Jenkins of Third Eye Blind on Twitter nudging him to do the same by referencing Pearl Jam’s initiative. Days later, Stephan’s team got in touch with us to discuss mitigating the emissions for their upcoming 2019 Summer Gods Tour with Jimmy Eat World and Ra Ra Riot. He accepted the Twitter fan’s challenge and wanted to raise the bar by including the carbon footprint of the fan travel to each stop of their tour.

This past August, Bill Flederbach, ClimeCo’s President & CEO, and Dan Linsky, VP of Voluntary Markets, asked me to join them at Third Eye Blind’s final tour stop at the FivePoint Amphitheater in Irvine, California. Fast forward to that evening: Stephan Jenkins, lead singer, songwriter, and guitarist announced mitigating the carbon footprint for the entirety of fan travel for their 2019 Summer Gods Tour on top of mitigating the tour itself. About halfway through the setlist, Stephan honored ClimeCo by inviting Bill and Dan onstage and presenting them with a Silk Floss Tree, which would be planted at FivePoint Amphitheatre as a continued reminder of ClimeCo’s support. It was a magical, feel-good moment. I felt immensely gratified to be recognized for the work we had put into this amazing cause.

Music unites us all. Why not unite to make it cleaner for our planet? Why not nudge and call on other artists to do the same as Pearl Jam and Third Eye Blind? Let’s open their eyes, educate, and inform them that carbon mitigation is an option. Let’s tell them how much we care. And let’s convince them they should too.

Photo by Stephen Albanese

About the Author

Danielle A. Pingitore has 10+ years of experience in sales and marketing and is enjoying the challenges of the carbon market. Dani holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing and a Certificate of Recognition in Advertising through Kutztown University. Dani loves music and enjoys going to concerts, traveling, and spending time with loved ones.