Glossary

Beyond the Trees

Beyond the Trees

Beyond the Trees

By providing carbon credits generated by an Alaskan-based forest preservation project on Afognak Island, ClimeCo assisted two bands, Pearl Jam and Third Eye Blind, in mitigating emissions generated during their respective tours.  The Afognak Forest Carbon Project, developed from a partnership between the American Land Conservancy and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, preserves 8,200 acres of centuries-old Sitka spruce forest from any future logging exploitation, ensuring it will sequester carbon long into the future.

A project that protects such a vast area will additionally result in a myriad of benefits that traverse economic, social and environmental categories.  But, as a biologist with a background in ecological research, I am pulled towards the latter – the environmental benefits.  In particular, I focus on the impressive amount of biodiversity that will be conserved by protecting the forest.

Afognak island is home to a host of animals. Among them are the Roosevelt Elk, 160 species of birds, wild salmon populations, and the largest species of bear, the Kodiak.  Forest preservation efforts promise that critters like these will continue to thrive in an environment untainted by human hand.  However, it is important to note that because of the vast interconnectedness of ecosystems, the positive effects extend past the well-publicized animals to all levels in the system.  While these effects are far-reaching and positive, it is also true that disruptive human actions will create similar ripples that reach far beyond the well-publicized species.  Illustrating this point is the tumultuous history of Gray Wolf populations within Yellowstone National Park.

In the early 1900s, wolves were considered to be a nuisance by ranchers, and by the late 1920s, due to predator control programs, wolf populations were extirpated from Yellowstone.  They didn’t return for nearly 70 years when a team of researchers undertook a campaign to reintroduce wolves into the park.  The wolves thrived and the remarkable impact that they had on the park’s ecosystem was soon obvious.

The most apparent change that researchers noted was the behavior of the elk and deer.  The predatorial nature of the wolves caused these large herbivores to avoid certain areas in order to escape becoming wolf lunch.  Now, that’s a fairly intuitive consequence.  What’s far less intuitive, however, are the broader implications that the renewed predator-prey relationship had on the rest of the park. 

The elk and deer, keen to avoid areas where they were vulnerable, stayed away from the stream banks and lowlands.  This resulted in far less browsing of streamside vegetation, leading to less erosion, which in turn promoted more natural water flows. From this, aquatic populations thrived.  This is truly remarkable!  Simply by being present, the wolves changed the rivers, returning the very lifeblood of the park to what it was before the wolves were removed.  And there are countless other ecosystem benefits the wolves provided to Yellowstone (If you’re curious and would like to learn more, I recommend watching ‘How Wolves Change Rivers’. (The video probably had a larger influence than I’d like to admit on my decision to study these animals.)

The point here is that whether we’re discussing the importance of a keystone predator, like the Gray wolf in Yellowstone, or a primary producer, such as the Sitka Spruce on Afognak Island, interactions within these large ecosystems are endlessly complicated. Preserving the forests on Afognak Island mean so much more than just sequestering carbon; it means protecting the vast, complicated web of interactions that connect the multitude of species that call these landscapes home. 

Utilizing environmental markets to incentivize and promote investments in forestry projects such as Afognak will ensure the preservation of these large, complicated ecosystems, and all the biodiversity that exists within them, long into the future.

To learn more about Afognak and how you can support their ecosystem, contact us here.

 

 

About the Author

Quin Pompi, a Project Associate with ClimeCo Corporation specializing in business development and project management, graduated from Princeton University with a degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. As an undergraduate, he completed his thesis research in the vonHoldt lab, where he examined the effects of sarcoptic mange disease on the reintroduced Yellowstone wolf population.

Third Eye Blind Mitigates Upcoming Summer Tour with ClimeCo

Third Eye Blind Mitigates Upcoming Summer Tour with ClimeCo

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION
Danielle A. Pingitore, Marketing Coordinator
(484) 415-0501 or dpingitore@climeco.com

Third Eye Blind Mitigates Upcoming Summer Tour with ClimeCo

January 29th, 2018 (BOYERTOWN, PA) – ClimeCo is excited to announce that they will be working with Third Eye Blind to voluntarily mitigate the carbon emissions of their 2019 Summer Gods Tour.  The tour will begin on June 14th in Los Angeles and end on August 3rd in Irvine, CA.  The tour will also include Jimmy Eat World and Ra Ra Riot as show openers.  Tickets will go on sale to the general public beginning Friday, February 1st at 10:00 AM local time at LiveNation.com

“I’ve enjoyed Third Eye Blind in concert at several venues, including one in Lake Placid, NY under the ski jumps,” says William Flederbach, President of ClimeCo.  “It was a very memorable and chilly event that the band will certainly not forget!  I am so pleased to see that in addition to their great music, the band is focused on environmental stewardship and I am very proud that ClimeCo could partner with the Third Eye Blind to offset the tour’s carbon footprint”.

Third Eye Blind has been touring greener every year.  Because the oceans need our help, the band and crew have been free of water bottles since 2017.  This year, to offset the tour’s carbon footprint, Third Eye Blind will be voluntarily investing in a carbon offset project in Alaska managed by ClimeCoThe American Land Conservancy, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.  Additionally, to offset audience travel – the biggest source of carbon emissions from the tour – a portion of each ticket sold on Live Nation will support a US-based ClimeCo carbon offset project. 

“Music and surfing are all foundational in my life and the longer I go, the more so it’s not a big step to seek to make our tours ocean-friendly,” says lead singer and guitarist, Stephan Jenkins. “Simple – skip single-use plastic, carbon offsets, and encourage others along the way.“

This Alaska-based offset project is the first of its kind in the region and supports conservation work on Afognak Island which is home to a coastal temperate rainforest with old-growth trees that are between 180 and 250 years old, plus a regrowth of new trees from the past 30 years. Together, these new and old forests create the potential for absorbing millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

The project will help to protect this area from logging and other potentially destructive practices on the land to preserve its ecological value and nature. It also preserves the habitat for many important animal species, including Roosevelt elk, the Kodiak brown bear, red fox, river otter, weasels, five species of Pacific salmon and the bald eagle. 

ClimeCo is a leader in the management and development of environmental commodities. They maintain a diverse portfolio of offsets to meet their customers’ volume, project, and geographical diversification criteria. ClimeCo is proud to support this great Alaskan forestry project and offer forestry offsets to their customers.

ClimeCo Corporation is a respected project developer, advisor and trader of environmental commodity market products. Specialized expertise in regional criteria pollutant trading programs, California cap‐and‐trade, voluntary markets and project development and financing of internal CO2 abatement systems complement ClimeCo’s diverse commodity portfolio. Within the Climate Action Reserve, ClimeCo is the largest developer of U.S. GHG‐offset projects and producer of U.S. voluntary carbon offsets, managing projects that reduce more than four million tonnes of CO2e per year. For info, contact 484‐415-0501, nmarshall@climeco.com or dpingitore@climeco.com.

Pearl Jam Mitigates 2018 Tour Carbon Emissions with ClimeCo

Pearl Jam Mitigates 2018 Tour Carbon Emissions with ClimeCo

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION
Contact: Nancy Marshall, Corporate Marketing Director
(864) 266‐1210 or nmarshall@climeco.com

Pearl Jam Mitigates 2018 Tour Carbon Emissions with ClimeCo

October 17, 2018 (BOYERTOWN, PA) – ClimeCo is pleased to announce that Pearl Jam will voluntarily mitigate an estimated 3,500 tons of carbon dioxide produced by their 2018 European and US tour dates through an Alaska-based forest preservation project.

“We are so thankful for the example Pearl Jam sets when it comes to offsetting the greenhouse gas emissions that result from their concert tours,” said Dan Linsky, VP Voluntary Markets at ClimeCo.  “As a longtime fan of their music, I am thrilled to be working with them to support the Afognak Forest Project.”

This Alaska-based offset project is the first of its kind in the region and supports conservation work on Afognak Island which is home to a coastal temperate rainforest with old-growth trees that are between 180 and 250 years old, plus a regrowth of new trees from the past 30 years.  Together, these new and old forests create the potential for absorbing millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

The project will help to protect this area from logging and other potentially destructive practices on the land to preserve its ecological value and nature.  It also preserves the habitat for many important animal species, including Roosevelt elk, the Kodiak brown bear, red fox, river otter, weasels, five species of Pacific salmon and the bald eagle.

“As a band, it’s important for us to be accountable for the pollution we create.  Since 2004, we’ve invested in projects around the world to mitigate the CO2 emissions caused by our tours.  This investment is for a verified offset project intended to protect and manage the forests on Afognak, and keep Alaska wild,” said Stone Gossard, Pearl Jam’s lead guitarist who manages the band’s carbon mitigation projects.

The project on Afognak Island has gone through the rigorous assessment process of the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), the world’s leading voluntary carbon accounting framework, managed by the non-profit organization Verra.  Through this process, independent experts use the VCS to verify the environmental integrity of the emissions reductions and removals that the project has generated.

Pearl Jam has calculated and offset their tour-related carbon dioxide emissions since 2003. You can view the band’s carbon mitigation history on their website

ClimeCo is a leader in the management and development of environmental commodities.  They maintain a diverse portfolio of offsets to meet their customers’ volume, project, and geographical diversification criteria. ClimeCo is proud to support this great Alaskan forestry project and offer forestry offsets to their customers.

ClimeCo Corporation is a respected project developer, advisor and trader of environmental commodity market products. Specialized expertise in regional criteria pollutant trading programs, California cap‐and‐trade, voluntary markets and project development and financing of internal CO2 abatement systems complement ClimeCo’s diverse commodity portfolio. Within the Climate Action Reserve, ClimeCo is the largest developer of U.S. GHG‐offset projects and producer of U.S. voluntary carbon offsets, managing projects that reduce more than four million tonnes of CO2e per year. For information, contact 484‐415‐0501 or nmarshall@climeco.com.